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Cauliflower – Healthy Eating

Packed with rich nutrients, cauliflower or cabbage flower is one of the commonly used flower-vegetable. The flower heads contain numerous health benefiting phtyo-nutrients such as indole-3-carbinol, sulforaphane etc., that help prevent prostate, ovarian and cervical cancers.

Health benefits of Cauliflower

It is very low in calories. 100 g of the fresh cauliflower head provides only 26 calories. Nevertheless, it comprises of several health-benefiting antioxidants and vitamins in addition to be very low in fat and contains no cholesterol. Its florets contain about 2 g of dietary fiber per 100 g; providing about 5% of recommended value. Cauliflower contains several anti-cancer phyto-chemicals like sulforaphane and plant sterols such as indole-3-carbinol, which appears to function as an anti-estrogen agent. Together these compounds have proven benefits against prostate, breast, cervical, colon, ovarian cancers by virtue of their cancer-cell growth inhibition, cytotoxic effects on cancer cells.

Furthermore, Di-indolyl-methane (DIM), a lipid soluble compound present abundantly in Brassica group of vegetables has found effective as immune modulator, anti-bacterial and anti-viral compound by synthesis and potentiating Interferon-Gamma receptors. DIM has currently been found application in the treatment of recurring respiratory papillomatosis caused by the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and is in Phase III clinical trials for cervical dysplasia. Fresh cauliflower is an excellent source of vitamin C; 100 g provides about 48.2 mg or 80% of daily recommended value. Vitamin-C is a proven antioxidant helps fight against harmful free radicals, boosts immunity and prevents from infections and cancers. It contains good amounts of many vital B-complex groups of vitamins such as folates, pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and thiamin (vitamin B1), niacin (B3) as well as vitamin K. These vitamins is essential in the sense that body requires them from external sources to replenish and required for fat, protein and carbohydrate metabolism.

Further, It is an also good source of minerals such as manganese, copper, iron, calcium and potassium. Manganese is used in the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Potassium is an important intracellular electrolyte helps counter the hypertension effects of sodium.

Broccoli – Healthy Eating

Broccoli is high in vitamin C, as well as dietary fiber; it also contains multiple nutrients with potent anti-cancer properties, such as diindolylmethane and small amounts of selenium. A single serving provides more than 30 mg of vitamin C and a half-cup provides 52 mg of vitamin C. The 3,3′-Diindolylmethane found in broccoli is a potent modulator of the innate immune response system with anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity. Broccoli also contains the compound glucoraphanin, which can be processed into an anti-cancer compound sulforaphane, though the benefits of broccoli are greatly reduced if the vegetable is boiled. Broccoli is also an excellent source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical which boosts DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells.

Boiling broccoli reduces the levels of suspected anti-carcinogenic compounds, such as sulforaphane, with losses of 20–30% after five minutes, 40–50% after ten minutes, and 77% after thirty minutes. However, other preparation methods such as steaming, microwaving, and stir frying had no significant effect on the compounds.

Broccoli has the highest levels of carotenoids in the brassica family. It is particularly rich in lutein and also provides a modest amount of beta-carotene.

A high intake of broccoli has been found to reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Broccoli consumption may also help prevent heart disease.

Pears – Healthy Eating

Pears are a good source of dietary fiber and a good source of vitamin C. Most of the vitamin C, as well as the dietary fiber, is contained within the skin of the fruit.

Pears are less allergenic than many other fruits, and pear juice is therefore sometimes used as the first juice introduced to infants. However, caution is recommended for all fruit juice consumption by infants, as studies have suggested a link between excessive fruit juice consumption and reduced nutrient intake, as well as a tendency towards obesity. Pears are low in salicylates and benzoates, so are recommended in exclusion diets for allergy sufferers. Along with lamb and rice, pears may form part of the strictest exclusion diet for allergy sufferers.

Most of the fiber is insoluble, making pears a good laxative.

Watermelon – Healthy Eating

A watermelon contains about 6% sugar and 92% water by weight. As with many other fruits, it is a source of vitamin C.

  • Watermelon, raw (edible parts)
  • Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
  • Energy 127 kJ (30 kcal)
  • Carbohydrates 7.55 g
  • - Sugars 6.2 g
  • - Dietary fiber 0.4 g
  • Fat 0.15 g
  • Protein 0.61 g
  • Water 91.45 g
  • Vitamin A equiv. 28 μg (4%)
  • Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.033 mg (3%)
  • Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.021 mg (2%)
  • Niacin (vit. B3) 0.178 mg (1%)
  • Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.221 mg (4%)
  • Vitamin B6 0.045 mg (3%)
  • Folate (vit. B9) 3 μg (1%)
  • Vitamin C 8.1 mg (10%)
  • Calcium 7 mg (1%)
  • Iron 0.24 mg (2%)
  • Magnesium 10 mg (3%)
  • Phosphorus 11 mg (2%)
  • Potassium 112 mg (2%)
  • Zinc 0.10 mg (1%)

Percentages are relative to

US recommendations for adults.

Source: USDA Nutrient Database

The amino-acid citrulline was first extracted from watermelon and analyzed.[8] Watermelons contain a significant amount of citrulline and after consumption of several kilograms, an elevated concentration is measured in the blood plasma; this could be mistaken for citrullinaemia or other urea cycle disorders.[9]

Watermelon rinds, usually a light green or white color, are also edible and contain many hidden nutrients[vague], but most people avoid eating them due to their unappealing flavor. They are sometimes used as a vegetable.[10] In China, they are stir-fried, stewed or more often pickled. When stir-fried, the skin and fruit is removed, and the rind is cooked with olive oil, garlic, chili peppers, scallions, sugar and rum. Pickled watermelon rind is also commonly consumed in the Southern US.[11] Watermelon juice can be made into wine.[12]

Watermelon is mildly diuretic[13] and contains large amounts of beta carotene.[14] Watermelon with red flesh is a significant source of lycopene. Preliminary research indicates the consumption of watermelon may have antihypertensive effects.[15]

Why Eat Honeydew Melons?

Honeydew melons are the sweetest of the melons. They are an excellent source of potassium. One serving of honeydew melon will give you almost half of the vitamin C you need for one day.

Honeydew melons provide a number of alternatives for your healthy diet. They are rich in Vitamin C, potassium, pantothenic acid, and Vitamin B6 that help to overcome high blood pressure, skin disorders and other related problems of the circulatory system. These melons are at their nutritive best when ripe. But there is one risk associated with ripe honeydew melons- they are highly perishable. After a long and tedious research, scientists have finally come up with a solution to keep honeydew melons at their ‘sweetest best’. The solution is very simple indeed. All you need is to drown the melons in a water-bath containing a special calcium-amino acid solution right after harvest.

The calcium in the solution penetrates the rind to make it firmer and increases its shelf life. Thus the aging process of melons is arrested to a great extent. However, growers have to be a little careful deciding the time of picking of honeydew melons. Once picked, honeydew melons do not develop further sweetness. Hence, a great attention must be directed towards the picking of these melons.

The nutritional value of fruit, like Honeydew Melon, makes it an excellent choice for both weight control and general health. Fruit contains energy-giving fructose (low on the glycemic index), several essential vitamins and minerals, phytochemicals, plus dietary fiber for better health, digestion and blood glucose control. So, even if you’re counting carbs to lose weight, make sure you eat plenty of healthy fruit.

The honeydew melon is:

  • Low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium
  • High in Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, Folate and Potassium

The nutritional value and health benefits of honeydew melons make them ideal for:

  • Maintaining optimum health
  • Weight loss

Don’t include honeydew melons in your diet if you’re interested in:

  • Weight gain